Books

For most of us, online personas offer reductive or escapist avatars of our mundane selves. But the best employ the rigid strictures of platforms—140-character ceilings, 1:1 aspect ratios, the remoteness of handheld screens—to convey mindfulness that isn’t cleanly expressed in speech. Darcie Wilder speaks with a precise, measured calm, such that during our interview I momentarily dismissed the fearless, almost unhinged candor of her online voice—the same online voice which has amassed a Twitter...
One evening in early April, Katie McKenna was nestled into a corner seat at HiFi, a bar in the East Village. Between sips of her gin and soda, the 30-something-year-old was rehearsing an excerpt of her memoir, which she would be reading later that night as part of Lyrics, Lit & Liquor. Comprised of readings, trivia and performances, the event was featured by Time Out as one of its “Things to Do”—adding to McKenna’s...
“I am, I am, I am,” reads one of the many tattoos Alana Massey uncovers after falling down a late-night Tumblr rabbit hole. The quote is from Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, when Esther tries to commit suicide in the bath. And the skin in question belongs to a woman who frequents “the sadder corner of the women’s Internet,” as Massey puts it, an internet subculture that valorizes Plath and dissects the complicated pain...
On February 6, 2015, Losing Ground opened at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Centering on a summer during the unraveling marriage of a professor and an artist, this was its first theatrical run. Intended to play at the theater for one week, it was extended to last for twenty days due to its popularity. At the Film Society, it was part of a series called “Tell It Like It Is: Black Independents in...

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