5 Questions With: Johnny Lewis

It took Johnny Lewis a little while (and a cross-country move) to come around to folk music. He cut his teeth as a producer for indie electronic acts like Lizzo and Bokonon, before becoming a full-fledged performer in his own right, opening for major acts like The Flaming Lips, and then moving to New York City, where he picked up an acoustic guitar and never looked back. The resulting sound — self-described as “progressive dream folk” — fuses the best of what he learned on the electronic music scene with classical Americana and north-country folk. His self-titled debut drops on September 23rd. Personally, we recommend checking out his stellar Daytrotter session, previewing the track “Familiar Chime,” and catching him live on his upcoming tour.

Stick around for his Brooklyn recs, after the jump.

Name: Johnny Lewis

Neighborhood: Crown Heights

Record listened most to in life: Desire, by Bob Dylan. Between this record being Dylan’s 1970’s comeback album, the political pull it had at the time concerning Rubin Carter, the impeccable Spanish overtones of the percussion and Bobby’s newly revived vocal deliverance, this record’s power and grace is unparalleled.

Brooklyn-based band to look out for: Xenia Rubinos. Saw Xenia at Union Pool last summer and her stage presence kind of sentenced me to some other rhythmic dimension. Have never spoken to Xenia, but: “Hey Girl.”

Fave place to see a show: Baby’s All Right. Fancy. Great sound. Great hang. You feel like you’re in the right spot when you walk in those doors under the J Train.

Fave Brooklyn bar: Toñita’s. Throwback. Last true Puerto Rican bar standing in the shape-shifting Williamsburg. You’re a guest here, let’s keep it that way.

Go to drink: Beco in Williamsburg. This BRazilian cubby of a bar is bound to make you and your comrades delve into that summer conversations, regardless of the season when they dish out that muddled Roska/Caipirinha drink of theirs.