Julia Rothman was studying the art featured in her bathroom magazine collection when she realized that every cover in the stack had been created by a man. She dug into the magazine’s archives to investigate the year’s covers, and discovered that out of 55 covers released in 2015, only four had been created by female-identified artists. “I called Wendy MacNaughton and I was like, ‘Did you know about this,” said Rothman. “‘This is wild...
Photographs of Ni’Ja Whitson seem to capture a flash of hair, a bit of cheek, an outstretched arm: Ni’Ja’s a dancer and choreographer, so that makes sense, but the images also show an intense focus on the work—not on the camera. Ni’Ja explains, “I am furiously, fiercely committed to a creative practice that is unabashed and uncompromising, that is a contribution to liberation, that is an unapologetic offering of all of the Black Queer...
Throw anything in Brooklyn (but something soft, please) and you’ll hit a panel where Kimberly Drew is describing a beautiful world where “more marginalized people enter institutions, learn the rules, and shatter and restructure them.” It’s a version of her story. As @museummammy on Instagram, a diary of both her life and black art (sometimes the same thing), she has over one hundred thousand followers. Her Tumblr, also wildly popular (Black Contemporary Art) came...
Clara and Jennifer are in charge of The Chimney, a gallery in Bushwick lined with bricks and shaped like a big box with one major door, one minor door, and a chimney (the chimney). It can feel dark and foreboding compared to a classic bright, white gallery, and while that doesn’t limit the work, it certainly influences it: shows are curated to dramatize and fill the space. Multidisciplinary and international artists are of particular...
Lisa Small, the Brooklyn Museum’s Curator of European Painting and Sculpture shares five highlights from Georgia O’Keefe: Living Modern, open now. Alfred Stieglitz Stieglitz, signature image “For this photo session, O’Keeffe wore a bowler-like black hat and wrapped herself in Stieglitz’s cape hiding its prominent buttons and collar. Stieglitz photographed her from a low vantage point, highlighting her audacity in dressing so that her gender was obscured or, one might say, appeared simultaneously male and female. Like other radical women...
Between $18 cocktails at The Armory Show and two floors of great art at SPRING/BREAK, there's a lot to see this weekend, the tail-end of Armory Week. The highest concentration of Brooklyn galleries and artists is, unsurprisingly, at New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) and at SPRING/BREAK—Hyperallergic called NADA "the perennial cool-kids fair" and New York Magazine's Senior Art Critic Jerry Saltz said of SPRING/BREAK, "I really saw a lot of good stuff at this one last...
In almost every context, white men are the only makers afforded a blank canvas; everyone else gets qualified. When these qualifications (black, female, gay, on and on) bubble up without context, assumptions can take over the reading of the work—assumptions that the artist intended to employ the politics of race, of being female, of being anything other than an artist making work informed by, but not restrained by, their identity. It’s the ancient blunder...
LAUNCH F18—FLAGS DOWN: TYLER LAFRENIERE Launch F18 is in Manhattan, but Tyler Lafreniere is a Greenpoint boy (except for his unending devotion to Maspeth, Queens, where he runs Mrs. Gallery with Sara Maria Salamone). Previous installations by Lafreniere, all painstakingly casual, involved hand-sewn jock straps (Comfort and Support), a La-Z-Boy, and Ballantine (Tap the Rockies). Low-key, old-school bro stylings all around. It looks like this new one, his third solo show with the gallery since 2012, has sardines and OSB (oh...
106 GREEN—TOO MANY MORNINGS: SHAWN POWELL Shawn Powell wrote a screenplay to accompany the paintings in his solo show. (I wonder about painters and movies; are painters jealous, sometimes?) It begins: "Black screen (soothing sound of waves advancing and retreating from the shore)" then this text appears in black and white: "She found herself alone by the sea." The woman Powell writes about, and paints, lives on a surreal island. Worms and mannequin heads populate the beach, but it's...

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