WSJ Names Kensington The New Hot Spot For Gentrifiers

church.jpg

  • Kensington Brooklyn Blog

Another day, another piece from a serious newspaper informing us of the hottest, newest, latest neighborhood to move to in Brooklyn.

Today, per the Wall Street Journal, New York’s hottest club is Kensington.

According to the WSJ and various real estate experts, “gentrification of the bordering neighborhoods of Ditmas Park and Windsor Terrace is gradually creeping in,” with renters lured by streets “vibrant with ethnic shops and restaurants” and a relatively cheap mix of apartments and houses for sale.

Essentially, the same picture you see in most neighborhoods being populated by wealthier transplants.

Perhaps most notably, the neighborhood once served by just the F train, now has permanent service by the G line as well, connecting it to both Williamsburg and Greenpoint, two other neighborhoods we’ve been recently told are hot hot hot with newcomers to the borough.

The article ends with a short list of train lines, restaurants, schools, shops, and parks in the area, as any good travel logue must.

Aren’t you starting to miss the good old days when gentrifiers had to do their own legwork to find out which neighborhoods to swarm and makeover in their own image, rather than just having newspapers hip them to the hot new hoods?

Like the time I discovered Bushwick, all by myself, without help from you or The New York Times or anybody!

Just kidding, obviously, but all these supposed news articles that exist for the sole purpose of alerting people to the existence of “new,” ripe-for-the-refurbishing neighborhoods — all while making self-effacing references to the changes brought on by gentrification, mind you — are starting to feel a little off.

Are any current Kensington residents reading this and thinking “Finally, the call to arms we’d hoped for!” And for that matter, how many apartment seekers have now decided to run, not walk, to Kensington thanks to this new guide? Well, maybe lots of them for all I know. After all, the neighborhood does have “ethnic food.”